Writing

Do nanowrimo, don’t write your book

If you haven’t heard of nanowrimo, check it out – however, given the nature of this blog, I’ll assume that you have heard of it.

Now go get started, you’re already a day late.

If you are anything like me, then you probably have about six or seven ideas lying around but one or two to which you are truly committed. These are the ones that, if you did them well, you think would be truly worth reading. Or, at least, might be picked up by someone other than family and friends!

Don’t start this book during nanowrimo. Especially if you have never written anything full length before, just don’t do it. First of all, once the path has been laid down it will be hard to travel any other. Even if you just treat it as a trial run, you will be fleshing out your story in a rush. This is never good and the main points you decide on will be hard to break, the characters will have already been developed. And worse, you’ll be attached to these characters and loathe to change them. The same goes for plot devices, mood, sequence, all these things will now have a certain form in your mind that will be hard to change.

Why’s that bad? They were formed in a rush and, likely, the planning didn’t go much further than a chapter ahead. It’s just a trainwreck waiting to happen and you’ll be really attached to that trainwreck.

So don’t write the novel that you have been planning forever. Rather, write a simpler story, one of the other ideas you’ve had kicking around. You’ll get the practice or writing daily, you’ll learn how to shape longer story arches, how to take your time on descriptions, etc. All of which will VASTLY improve your real novel. Don’t waste your favorite idea on a rush job – you will just end up disappointed. But if you pick a story arch that is simpler and to which you are less attached, it can be a wonderful learning experience!

So get cracking, you’re already behind!

Advertisements
Standard